Lectures at 10am, Crossroads United Church, 690 Sir John A. Macdonald Blvd

Our member Stan Sherry pointed out two special guest speakers coming to two different locations in Kingston in the next few months that you might want to go hear.

Professor ZotanTakats, from the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery at Imperial College, London, UK, will be a guest speaker at Queen's, Dept. of Surgery, On THURSDAY, NOV. 9, 2017, 5:00 P.M. , AT QUEEN'S SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 15 ARCH STREET, ROOM 132 A.

The Canadian astronaut CHRIS HADFIELD will be at our local GRAND THEATRE on Feb. 24th 2018.

 

steve manders book first spike

Steve Manders, who has given a number of lectures with Later Life learning, is promoting his new book, The First Spike, a history not only of the K&P but also of much that went on in Kingston and southeastern Ontario in the 19th century insofar as it related to transportation and communication.

K&P stands for "Kingston and Pembroke," and was the first railroad to link Kingston with the timber and mining hinterland to the north. It opened in 1878. In 1885, the little railway station that now stands across Ontario Street from City Hall was built from cut stone that originally formed part of the battery wall that defended Kingston from American attack.

A graduate of Queen's University in geography and education, Steve has spent much of his spare time hiking and paddling the transportation routes north of the city. It was during these many hikes and portages that he realized that some of the trails he was hiking were old railway lines that had fallen into disuse and grown over. He started bringing a metal detector with him and mapping the places where he found railway spikes, bits of rail, and metal railway and logging tools. Gradually he was able to trace the old K&P line all the way north to Renfrew.

One of our recent lecturers was in the Whig

Dr. David Lyon, professor at Queen's Surveillance Studies Centre.

Big Data 175, part of the much larger Big Data Surveillance project, will be hosting (Jan 16 2017) a screening of Citizenfour at the Screening Room in Kingston. After the Academy Award-winning documentary about American Edward Snowden, who helped expose the depth of big data and its many uses in society, there will be a discussion and Q&A on the "Big Brother" topic.

This is an extract from the recent article ran as part of the Women Mean Business Network in Nov 2016  and printed in Kingston Whig. Natalie is one of the 2016 nominees!

Life Learning was started 30 years ago by Bunny Singer. The concept of the business arose when Bunny was completing a Master's degree while she was over the age of 50. She wanted to inspire other members of her generation to continue learning. When Bunny retired, Later Life Learning was left in Natalie Holland's good hands. Natalie describes Later Life Learning as "a wonderful concept within the community."

steve manders smSteven Manders has been working closely with Later Life Learning. He is the author of  "Kingston & Pembroke Railway, Lost and Found"

I am retired but researching many of the old railways of eastern Ontario both in archives and especially with boots on the ground. I have examined 61 railways to date, found 75 original still standing stations, and photographed them, posted photos on Google Earth, each with a short history of what is in the picture. I have examined the K&P from end to end, and studied some critical sections of it and a few other local railways with a metal detector looking for artifacts which has been very informative. I have examined many of the mines that were critical to getting the K&P built along with the logging industry. This includes 7 tramways and 3 un-named canals to date.

I have given 7 presentations on the subject to the local historical societies and I will be giving a presentation to the Lennox and Addington Historical society next January (2017). I will be giving a second presentation to the Canadian Railroad Historical Association in December (2016).

 

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